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DIY Industrial Farmhouse Table

Build this simple DIY Industrial Farmhouse Table with only framing materials and five tools! How-to video and free plans by Shanty2Chic.

We built this DIY Industrial Farmhouse Table for our friend Rachel’s Shanty House Crash! Rachel asked us to crash her kitchen nook. She has three boys so we wanted to give her a table that was not only durable but chic and budget friendly.Just click the Play Button below to watch!

We put our brains together and designed this 6 foot industrial style, farmhouse table that we built with only framing $75 in framing lumber!

CLICK HERE TO JUMP TO THE FREE PRINTABLE PLANS

Follow along with the how-to below!

DIY Industrial Farmhouse Table

We started by ripping all of the 2×6 boards to 5″ and the 2×4’s to 3″. This is not a necessary step but it makes for nice straight edges and allows us to hide the seams on the chunky table legs that we built. The plans are based on ripping these boards so if you don’t rip them, make sure to adjust the measurements accordingly.

cuts-for-table

Next, we made all of our cuts for the table. Tip: for a precise breadboard cut, wait until the planks are attached and measure and cut to fit perfect. You can watch our How to use a Miter Saw video HERE!

drill-pocket-holes-in-2x6-boards

Once the cuts were made, we drilled all of the 1 1/2″ pocket holes with our Kreg Jig K5. Refer to the printable plans for pocket hole placement. You can find the Kreg Jig K5 HERE on Amazon. Watch our How to Use a Kreg Jig video HERE!

laminate-boards

Time to laminate! We put glue on one 2×6 and layered another 2×6 on top of it.

clamp-boards-to-laminate

Then, we used clamps to hold the boards in place. Do this for all 4 legs and let the wood glue dry overnight.

pocket-holes-in-planks

While the legs are drying, you can begin to build the planked top!

attach-planks

Attach all of the planks with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws.

attach-breadboards

Then, measure and cut the breadboards to fit! Attach with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws.

attach-aprons-to-legs

Once the legs are dry, you can build the table frame. First, attach the short and long aprons to the legs. The aprons will be flush with the top of the legs and centered on the face of the legs. Attach with wood glue and 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws.

glue-on-supports

Now for the supports. Apply wood glue to each support

attach-supports-with-pocket-screwsjpg

and attach them to the long aprons with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws.

center-leg-runners-rach

Once the supports are attached, you can attach the 4×4 leg runners. If you have a Kreg HD, then you can just drilled 3 1/2″ pocket holes into the 4×4’s. If not, you can just attach them with 3 1/2″ Spax screws from the front faces of the legs into the runners. You can hid the screw holes, with the hardware, at the end.

attach-short-runners

Now, attach the short runner, between the two leg runners. Use wood glue and 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws. The top of the runner should be flush with the top of the leg runners.

attach-long-runner

To attach the long runner, apply glue to the bottom of the long runner and clamp the long runner under the short runner. Attach with 2″ Spax screws from the bottom of the short runner into the long runner.

attach-frame-to-table-top

Next, put the table frame over the planked top and attach it to the top with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws from the aprons and supports into the table top.

Briarsmoke

We chose Briarsmoke stain by Varathane to finish the table. Wipe on one coat with a clean cloth, wait about 5 minutes and then wipe away the excess stain with a new clean cloth.

Varathane Triple Thick

To protect the finish, we applied one coat of Varathane Triple Thick Poly in Matte finish. Just brush on with a bristle brush. It will look like glue before it dries 🙂

Now to make it pretty (and industrial)!

strong-ties

Here is the hardware we used! 4 Simpson Strong-tie angles, 4 Simpson Strong-tie straps, 4 Simpson Strong-tie Outdoor Accents Washers and 4 Simpson Strong-ties Outdoor Accents hex screws. We spray painted the silver pieces with a flat, black spray paint.

You can find the metal angle pieces HERE and the straight piece HERE on Amazon. The Outdoor Accents are Home Depot finds.

attach-hardware

We attached the straps and angles to the table with small hex screws that we also painted black.

4x4-hardware

We used the washers and large hex screws on the legs, where the leg runners attached. This is where you can hide your screw holes if you didn’t use the HD Jig.

industrial-table-done

That was IT! How do you like it????

diy-industrial-farm-table
how-to-build-a-farmhouse-table
industrial-farmhouse-table

Rachel LOVED it and we do too 🙂 You can find out all the info for the rest of the pieces in her new kitchen nook below!

industrial-farmhouse-table

Planked Wall: How-to Video HERE!

Bench: HERE

Terrariums (on table): HERE

Stems: HERE

Table Runner: HERE

Chandelier: HERE

Chairs: HERE

Rug: HERE

Frames: Hobby Lobby

HOME Printable: HERE

Chalkboard: HERE

DIY Industrial Farmhouse Dining Table

Build this simple DIY Industrial Farmhouse Table with only framing materials and five tools! Click the link to download and print the free plans!
CLICK HERE TO PRINT THE FULL SET OF PLANS

Supply List

  • 9 2x6x8 Pine or Framing Lumber
  • 1 2x6x10 Pine or Framing Lumber
  • 3 2x4x8 Pine or Framing Lumber
  • 1 4x4x8 Pine or Framing Lumber
  • 2 1/2″ Pocket Hole Screws
  • Spax Screws
  • Wood Glue
  • Decorative Metal Pieces

Instructions

  • Cut List
  • Cut the boards for the planks. Then, drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes into 7 of the planks. Attach the planks with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws.
  • Now, measure and cut the breadboard pieces to fit. Drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes into the boards and attach them to the planks with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws and wood glue.
  • To create the legs, cut the boards to size, drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes in 4 of the pieces. Then, glue two pieces together (one with pocket holes and one without), clamp and let them sit for 24 hours.
  • Cut the long apron pieces and drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes. Attach them to the legs with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws and wood glue. The aprons will be centered on the legs where the pieces are joined together and flush with the top of the legs.
  • Cut the short runners to size, drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes and attach them with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws and wood glue. Center the short aprons on the wide side of the legs.
  • Cut the support pieces to size and drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes into each board. Attach to the inside of the long aprons with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws and wood glue.
  • Now, cut the 4×4 pieces and run between the legs. You can use 3.5″ Spax screws to attach the runners from the outside of the legs or use a Kreg HD to drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes. Make sure to use wood glue and fill screw holes if not using the Kreg.
  • Next, cut the short runner. Drill 1 1/2″ pocket holes in each end and attach with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws and wood glue.
  • Keep the base upside down and cut the long runner to size. Attach it underneath the short runner with wood glue and 2 1/2″ brad nails from the bottom of the short runner. This will hide the nail holes. The long runner should sit 3/4″ from the ned of the leg runners.
  • Set the table base on top of the table top and attach it to the table top with 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws from the aprons and supports into the table top.
  • Flip the table over and add decorative hardware We used framing brackets and spray painted them black.
  • All finished! Now you can paint or stain it to get the look you want. Try adding different hardware to really make it your own. Be sure to share your builds with us on social media and use #shanty2chic so we can share them too! Happy Building!

47 Comments

  1. Emily on July 27, 2021 at 5:03 pm

    Does anyone know plans for these measurements if the boards are not ripped?!?!

  2. Jim Sullivan on February 28, 2021 at 8:48 am

    Hi I have built a few of these now for my daughter in law and my niece. My only issue has been how to keep the boards on the table top on the same plane. I do not have a planer to take down the ridges so I have a belt sander and an orbital sander but hard to keep it flat. Any secrets? I also have bought a dowel jig and am now doweling the top together but still get variations in height of the boards. Thanks and I do love how they look and have another niece who wants one as well.

  3. Drake Charles on October 31, 2020 at 9:27 pm

    What would be the measurements if I wanted to do this table in 8 foot? Thank you☺️

  4. Allison on June 17, 2019 at 8:28 am

    I have a big family and would love to make this an 8 foot table. Is there an easy way to adjust for the extra 2 foot in length? This will be my first build.

  5. Alicia Hover on March 27, 2019 at 10:59 pm

    We built this table along with the benches. I absolutely LOVE it.

  6. EJ on February 24, 2019 at 10:23 am

    Everything calls for 2.5″ pocket screws. I had to go to shorter screws in places because the 2.5″ came out the sides of the boards 🙁

  7. Andrea Farrell on October 31, 2018 at 3:25 pm

    where did you get the large washer for the bottom of the leg? I can’t find it anywhere!

  8. Richard on October 11, 2018 at 8:03 pm

    Not able to locate drawings for the farmhouse table

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