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DIY Sawhorse Base Modern Farmhouse Dining Table

Hey friends! You all know we love a good farmhouse table…. But even better than that is a farmhouse table that costs around $80 in lumber to build! Yes, please! Come check out our latest table design…Come check out this DIY Sawhorse Base Modern Farmhouse Dining Table!

Let’s build it! I will add a link to the free printable plans at the bottom of this post!

The first step to building this table is creating the table top. These are 2×6 boards that we ripped down to 5”. We added 1.5” pocket hole screws down one long side of all but 1 of our plank boards, and also at the ends of each plank board. We attached the plank boards together first using 2.5” pocket hole screws. Once all plank boards are attached, line of the boards on each end and mark the exact measurement of the breadboards. Attach the breadboards using 2.5” pocket hole screws.

One of our favorite tools to use on this part is the Kreg Face Clamp. It allows us to flatten the boards easily. We just run it along the seam as we go down each board. You can see it HERE on Amazon.

We also use it when attaching the breadboards.

Moving on to the base assemblies! I used 2.5″ Spax screws for most of the assembly on this part. You can find them HERE.

You will build two of these that will be identical to each other. Start by cutting the leg pieces. These will have an 18.5˚ angles parallel to each other on each end. Mark their placement with a pencil on the top runner board and attach them with 2 or 2.5” Spax screws and wood glue through the runner and into each leg.

One of our other favorite tools is the GluBot… This thing is the bomb and saves so much time with gluing as well as helping to minimize the mess! You can see it HERE on Amazon!

Next, you will add the diagonal braces. The easiest way to get the angles on this part is to hold the board up on top of your assembly and use a pencil to draw the cuts. You will do this on each side, and attach the braces using wood glue and 2” finish nails. You can also add Spax screws through the top runner at an angle and also through the legs and into the bases if you need added support.

Mark and cut the leg braces next. Again, the easiest way to get this measurement is to hold the board in place and draw lines along the edges of the legs. Attach these boards using wood glue and 2” finish nails through the supports and into each leg.

Attach leg assemblies together with the runner. Add 1.5” pocket holes at both ends of the runner and attach it to the center of both leg
assembly using wood glue and 2.5” pocket hole screws. It is helpful to turn the leg assemblies upside-down on this part and lay the brace flat on the floor to attach it if you don’t have a good clamp.

Cut the small end supports and attach them using wood glue and 2.5” pocket hole screws through 1.5” pocket holes. These boards will help support your breadboards as well.

Now attach the long runner. This will sit in between each leg assembly
and flush with the bottom of the top runner. Attach this runner with 2.5” Spax screws and wood glue through the top runner and small side pieces and into the bottom runner.

The final step is attaching your table top. Lay the table top upside down on the floor and turn the base assembly upside down on top of it. Don’t use wood glue on this part! Attach the top through the supports and runners
and into the top using 2.5” Spax screws. Now you are ready for the finish!

I decided to mix Varathane Briarsmoke and Varathane Natural half and half to achieve the finish on this table and I love the result! It’s so simple to do… You just pour equal parts of both into a pan or can and stir it well. Then, just stain as you normally would! You can find the stain HERE at HD or HERE on Amazon!

Here she is all finished in our office! We sit and have many meals at this table :-).

You can click the link below to save and print the FREE plans for this modern farmhouse dining table!

4.5 from 2 votes

Sawhorse Base Farmhouse Table

Cutest farmhouse dining table you can build for under $80 in lumber! Click HERE to print these plans!

Supply List

  • 13 2x6x8 Framing Lumber rip each board to 5" wide each
  • several Kreg Pocket Hole Screws 2.5"
  • 1 wood glue
  • several 2" and 2.5" finish nails

Instructions

  • The first step to building this table is creating the table top. These are 2×6 boards that we ripped down to 5”. We added 1.5” pocket hole screws down one long side of all but 1 of our plank boards, and also at the ends of each plank board. We attached the plank boards together first using 2.5” pocket hole screws. Once all plank boards are attached, line of the boards on each end and mark the exact measurement of the breadboards. Attach the breadboards using 2.5” pocket hole screws.


  • Moving on to the base assemblies! You will build two of these that will be identical to each other. Start by cutting the leg pieces. These will have an 18.5˚ angles parallel to each other on each end. Mark their placement with a pencil on the top runner board and attach them with 2 or 2.5” Spax screws and wood glue through the runner and into each leg.


  • Next, you will add the diagonal braces. The easiest way to get the angles on this part is to hold the board up on top of your assembly and use a pencil to draw the cuts. You will do this on each side, and attach the braces using wood glue and 2” finish nails. You can also add Spax screws through the top runner at an angle and also through the legs and into the bases if you need added support.


  • Mark and cut the leg braces next. Again, the easiest way to get this measurement is to hold the board in place and draw lines along the edges of the legs. Attach these boards using wood glue and 2” finish nails through the supports and into each leg.


  • Attach leg assemblies together with the runner. Add 1.5” pocket holes at both ends of the runner and attach it to the center of both leg assemblies using wood glue and 2.5” pocket hole screws. It is helpful to turn the leg assemblies upside-down on this part and lay the brace flat on the floor to attach it if you don’t have a good clamp.


  • Cut the small end supports and attach them using wood glue and 2.5” pocket hole screws through 1.5” pocket holes. These boards will help support your breadboards as well.


  • Now attach the long runner. This will sit in between each leg assembly and flush with the bottom of the top runner. Attach this runner with 2.5” Spax screws and wood glue through the top runner and small side pieces and into the bottom runner.


  • The final step is attaching your table top. Lay the table top upside down on the floor and turn the base assembly upside down on top of it. Don’t use wood glue on this part! Attach the top through the supports and runners and into the top using 2.5” Spax screws. Now you are ready for the finish!


5 Comments

  1. Kimberly on August 7, 2019 at 11:23 am

    I agree with Steph’s comments above. I have the same experience. What do recommend? Nice work!

  2. Micaiah on July 18, 2019 at 7:19 am

    Just curious why not glue to top to the base?

    • Breakaway Builds on July 22, 2019 at 7:57 pm

      So that you can disassemble it if you have to move.

  3. Xaviour on July 18, 2019 at 12:16 am


    Good Stuff. I like it

  4. Steph on July 17, 2019 at 8:36 pm

    Hey! I love your site and your plans are excellent – so well written and easy to follow, and the illustrations are bomb! One question – I’ve built a couple things using your plans and I’ve got to ask, how do you get everything so flat and not warped? Every time I’ve made something where I have to plank together 2x anything, it never ends up flat!! Also, I get gaps in between the planks, too, despite ripping them. Any help there? Oh and do you guys sand all your stuff before staining? Thanks!!

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